“This doesn’t bode well.” Olivia remarked as we unpacked the tent for the first time. The tent inner and outer were separate, and the poles were colour-coded, making it obvious which one went into which slot in the outer, so I wasn’t unduly worried about pitching the thing. “How do you mean?” I asked. “Well, a tent called ‘Nemesis’…” she pointed out.

I hadn’t given much thought to the name that Vango have given to their Nemesis 300. Now that Olivia had pointed it out, it did seem a particularly odd name. The dictionary definition for ‘nemesis’ is: “The inescapable agent of someone’s of something’s downfall”. Oh, my goodness! Olivia was right. This did indeed not bode well.

Nemesis 300 from Vango
Nemesis 300 from Vango

However, here we were in a field on the edge of Buttermere, preparing to spend the night in something that promised to be the agent of my downfall.

Upon first inspection, the Nemesis appeared pretty harmless. Even though I’d not seen the tent before, it was very easy to pitch. The colour-coding for the poles helped of course, but everything, from the pegging out positions around the flysheet, to the guying points, and then the attachments for fastening the inner to the outer, were all very clear.

Nemesis 300 from Vango
Nemesis 300 from Vango
Colour-coded pole loops on the Nemesis 300 from Vango
Colour-coded pole loops on the Nemesis 300 from Vango

It pitched well, and didn’t appear to have any of the looseness, or flapping material of some of the other tents in this price bracket.

Vango's Nemesis 300 at night
Vango’s Nemesis 300 at night

Vango describe the Nemesis 300 as “Designed to withstand everything the British weather can throw at it. From snow to sand, sea level to summit, the Nemesis provides an incredibly stable shelter to spend the night.” As the Nemesis 300 retails at £250, that puts is squarely in a much lower price bracket than what you’d expect from a full-on all season, British mountain tent. However, it’s geodesic design, and build quality gave me confidence in the tent’s abilities in bad weather. Despite the rather odd name, the Nemesis 300 stayed pitched throughout that first night in Buttermere, and has failed to be the agent of my downfall on numerous camping and backpacking trips since.

Even Bertie enjoyed camping in the Nemesis 300 from Vango
Even Bertie enjoyed camping in the Nemesis 300 from Vango

I think the Nemesis 300 is superb value for money. It’s a 3-person tent, and has a lot of room inside for three to be comfortable. It boasts a double-porch so there is also plenty of room for kit on backpacks. The weight is a little on the hefty size at 4.28kg, but that shared between three people is pretty manageable. We really liked the amount of ventilation that the Nemesis afforded, as well as the various storage pockets when inside.

All in all, the Nemesis 300 is a great all-round tent. I haven’t yet pitched it on a mountain top in a storm, so can’t comment on that, but for everyday use in the British hills it is sturdy and hard-wearing. If only we could persuade Vango to change the name…

For the full spec and details from Vango go to Vango Trekking Tents – the Nemesis 300

 

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