I can’t believe it’s been over two months since I posted to this blog. It’s been a busy time here, with lots of day walks going on, but has it brought in enough money to get us through the winter months? Time will tell. We’ve still got some bookings for the autumn, and as long as the weather doesn’t stay as wild and windy as it is here today, we may get more new bookings coming in too before the winter really sets in.

Today though, it is horrible out there. The chickens didn’t want to come out for their food this morning, and Bertie stayed in bed with his nose tucked under his tail until half ten. So, a good day to write a new post!

A week or so ago we had one of my favourite walks here in Shetlands. The coast of Muckle Roe is fantastic – huge red cliffs torn apart by the sea and formed into leaning bastions, slim arches, and dark chasms. Most people who go to Muckle Roe follow the footpath sign to the Hams. They miss an awful lot by doing that. North and South Hams are a great destination, but the footpath sign points along a very dull landrover track, and unfortunately, most people just trudge there and back along this track.

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What they miss is the spectacular west coast of the island, as the track just cuts through the centre and throughout its length you’re surrounded by nothing but moorland.

For those who do explore the west coast the scenery is amazing. The stack in the photo above is one of my favourites – I don’t know why, but it just looks so slender and tenuous, especially when white surf pounds its narrow base. I’ve no idea if it even has a name, but we named it ‘The Fiddlers’ Bow’ – well, this is Shetland after all.

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Anyway, we did make it to the Hams, this is South Ham where one of the old haaf fishing stations can be seen. It’s a lovely spot, but I’m a sucker for dramatic cliff scenery, so we continued around to the North Ham, taking in all the craggy bits along the way.

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